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THE ODYSSEY: BELLY OF THE BEAST in South Windsor, CT on Sunday Jan. 13

Master Storyteller and Musician Odds Bodkin will perform The Odyssey: Belly of the Beast, his renowned modern-language version of Homer’s epic, on Sunday January 13, 2019 at 4 p.m. at Wapping Community Church in South Windsor, Connecticut.

The 80-minute show features an introduction to Homer’s Bronze Age world performed with Celtic harp.

Then, with a full score on 12-string guitar and characters, Bodkin tells the tale of Odysseus, from the Trojan Horse to the cave of the ravenous cyclops.

Tickets are $15 or $40 family price. Cash or checks only.

Appropriate for children 10 and up.

Call 860-644-0833 to reserve your seat.

Called “a consummate storyteller” by the New York Times and “a modern-day Orpheus” by Billboard, Bodkin’s bardic storytelling style is unique among spoken-word artists.

 

 

ODIN AND THOR BATTLE THE FROST GIANTS…Close to Sold Out!

Just a few tickets remain for Odds Bodkin’s performance of Viking myths and lore tomorrow night at Grendel’s Den in Cambridge, MA, so grab yours now while they last!

ODIN AND THOR BATTLE THE FROST GIANTS.

Sunday, Jan. 6th at 5 p.m. on Harvard Square.

Drink like a Viking.

Feast like a Viking.

But just don’t behave like one.

Why? Because this crowd has come to listen to Celtic harp, 12-string guitars and Odds Bodkin’s crazy voices for dwarves, Norse gods and giants.

 

TICKETS $15


Like merch? These will be available after the show!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warming Up for Viking Tales

 

“Autonomic” is a word that means you can do it without having to think about it.

In order to have this guitar theme “autonomic” for a Viking myths performance this coming Sunday, in this video I’m rehearsing it, essentially lighting up its old neural networks like turning on all the lights at an abandoned amusement park. Suddenly, there’s the Ferris Wheel, right where it was the last time.

It’s just made of music.

The show is ODIN AND THOR BATTLE THE FROST GIANTS. Location: Grendel’s Den on Harvard Square in Cambridge MA.  Date: Jan. 6, 2019. Time: 5 p.m.

TICKETS ARE $15

If you know any adults who enjoy mythic storytelling, please share this post!

The Neuroscience of Music in Real Time

At my web site I’ve got a new picture of my ugly mug, recently taken by my friend and fellow storyteller, Simon Brooks. I’ve been heavily right-brained all my life, and it shows in my left eye. It’s always slightly larger and more alive than the other one, no matter how much I try to keep my right eye open to look passably normal.

The right hemisphere of the brain–the seat of imagery and intuition–is connected to the left eye via the optic chiasm. Ask any brain scientist. They’ll confirm it. Same thing with the left brain; it’s wired up to the right eye.

You’d think since I use language in my work, it would be the other way around, but nope, the imagery side remains dominant, so I’ve just lived with it since my twenties and worn sun glasses whenever possible.

Of course, in my approach to storytelling, there’s music happening. According to Wikipedia on the Neuroscience of Music, the music part is a bit more complex:

Sequencing

Motor sequencing has been explored in terms of either the ordering of individual movements, such as finger sequences for key presses, or the coordination of subcomponents of complex multi-joint movements.[19] Implicated in this process are various cortical and sub-cortical regions, including the basal ganglia, the SMA and the pre-SMA, the cerebellum, and the premotor and prefrontal cortices, all involved in the production and learning of motor sequences but without explicit evidence of their specific contributions or interactions amongst one another.[19] In animals, neurophysiological studies have demonstrated an interaction between the frontal cortex and the basal ganglia during the learning of movement sequences.[26] Human neuroimaging studies have also emphasized the contribution of the basal ganglia for well-learned sequences.[27]

So it looks as if they’re really not sure what’s going on, other than while creating and playing music, all these regions are firing away together in happy harmony.

I’ve been thinking about all this because coming up in a week, I’ll be doing it in public down in Cambridge, MA, for a return appearance at Grendel’s Den. ODIN AND THOR BATTLE THE FROST GIANTS. Two 12-strings and a harp. Lots of language. Lots of music.

We’ll see how it all spins together this time.

As for my ugly mug, you needn’t worry. Half the audience listens with their eyes closed anyway.

The Takeover Before Christmas

The Takeover Before Christmas
A Rhyme by Odds Bodkin

‘Twas the month before Christmas, fifty-seventh floor.
The Chairman of the Board had just stormed in the door.
All the VPs tugged their collars and started to sweat.
He looked about as mad as a Chairman could get.

He yelled, “I hear there’s competition coming from up north!”
Then he swiped at his iPhone, looking back and forth.
“And yes, I’ve looked into the problem, figured out the cause.
Some old man working nights they call Santa Claus.”

So they filed a complaint with the SEC,
Said this Santa Claus guy’s got a monopoly.
Why, all the children in the world wait for him to appear!
So what if he delivers only one night a year?

So they wrote him out a writ that read from left to right,
Hired a hundred lawyers in case he put up a fight,
And they flew in their choppers up to the North Pole.
From his parka, the Chairman stared out at the cold:

“Santa Claus, Santa Clause, where do you belong?
I’m gonna send you down south to an old folks’ home.
Kick your feet up in the sun on Biscayne Bay,
And let the snow in your soul, melt away.”

Well, Santa welcomed in those hostile takeover guys,
Dressed in striped shirts, suspenders, and little bow ties,
But before he could get in any words edgewise
They slapped him with the writ, then offered compromise.

They said, “It’s cold and you’re old and elves aren’t that much fun.
Wouldn’t you rather be golfing down in the sun?
Where the beach people mingle and play all day?
Here’s a solid gold watch. We’ll give you severance pay.”

But Santa looked at them all and pulled on his glove.
“‘Tis a long way from earth, to heaven above.
And between, there are children. Not all are properly loved.”
And between them the old boy shoved.

But the Chairman said, “Wait! Someone’s getting bilked!
We’ve heard you’ve taken bribes of cookies and milk!
And that you’ve flown without a license in restricted airspace!
So either go down south, Santa, or go down in disgrace!”

Well, they flew old broken Santa down to Key Biscayne,
Where the only snow that ever falls is rain.
They traded in his snowsuit for sandals and lotion,
And left him in a beach chair, looking out at the ocean.

Meanwhile up north, poor Rudolf went out of his mind,
And elves showed up in unemployment lines.
And all the letters from the children lay unopened, unread,
For Santa Claus was gone. The Christmas Spirit seemed dead.

That Christmas Eve, the world’s children, all snug in bed,
Had fitful dreams as chopper blades roared overhead.
Down the chimneys fell presents, all wrapped by machine,
With computer bills that read, “Send no money ‘til spring.”

Meanwhile, down south, old Santa was a different man,
Betting fantasy football and sporting a tan.
He drove a fifty-seven Ford with lots of polished wood,
And instead of reindeer, had horses, under the hood.

But the tan and the shades, they were all just for show.
For though the beaches were white, they weren’t white as snow.
And though on Christmas Eve all the presents came,
To the kids, it just wasn’t the same.

But the TV’s cried out, “Sure the toys are the same!
So somebody else brought them? Hey, what’s in a name?
Oh, yes, and “Dear Santa” letters don’t apply anymore.
Just cross out “North Pole.” Write: “Fifty-seventh floor.”

And sure enough, the next Christmas, all the letters poured in,
All addressed in crayon, filling bin after bin,
And the Chairman saw his future––endless Christmas bull markets––
As he jumped from his limo and told his chauffeur to park it.

But imagine his surprise. His office was a tomb.
His golden parachute was falling toward financial doom.
The firm was in trouble. It was all on his head!
For they’d opened all those letters and every last one had said:

“We the kids of the world, we don’t think it’s funny,
How you took Santa’s love and all that’s left is money.
Our parents think so, too, and promise they’ll assist us.
So either bring Santa back or we’ll boycott Christmas!”

Well, the Chairman, he resigned. I mean, circumstances forced him.
He lost his limo, stocks and bonds. His lovely wife divorced him.
Salvation Army took him in and served him soup and fruit.
Next day he showed up at the mall dressed in a Santa suit.

So Christmas was put back to the way it once had been.
Santa blew out his Ford, but quickly traded it in,
Rounded up all his reindeer, got his elves off the dole,
And headed north listening to rock’n’roll.

Yes, Santa got back to the snow and ice
And started keeping his list of who’s naughty and nice,
And he wrote the world’s kids and said, “Thanks. Glad you missed us.
Peace on Earth. Rudolf’s fine. Oh, and Merry Christmas.”

 


 

Ho Ho Ho and Merry Christmas to All!

Odds Bodkin tells Viking Myths on January 6th

Odds Bodkin returns to Grendel’s Den in Cambridge, MA to perform ODIN AND THOR BATTLE THE FROST GIANTS: VIKING MYTHS OF ADVENTURE on Sunday night, January 6th at 5:00 p.m.

Eat and drink adult beverages like a Viking, then hear two epic Viking myths wrapped in little-known lore (Thursday is Thor’s Day; Wednesday is Wotan’s Day). First, a tale of magic and illusion as Thor and Loki journey to the city of their enemies, the Frost Giants. Meet Thor, big, strong, slightly dim and lovable, along with Loki, everything Thor is not. You’ll hear characterizations for these mythic characters, along with peasants and immense giants. And of course, a full score on 12-string guitar. Then, the long tale of Odin’s search for the blood of his best friend who’s been murdered, his blood brewed into a wisdom-bestowing elixir. Hear another 12-string, along with more music and voices for dwarves, a dangerous, lonely giantess, and Odin himself.

Plus little-known Viking lore (Russia was named after the Vikings?) explained as Odds plays Celtic harp and shows his scholarly side.

Adventure, humor and great acoustic music!

“one of the great voices in American storytelling”—Wired

TICKETS $15

EPICS AND CHILDREN’S DOWNLOADS for CHRISTMAS

Epics and Children’s Downloads for Christmas. Explore Odds Bodkin’s Shop for last minute storytelling gifts like The Odyssey: An Epic Telling (four hours) for older kids and teens, The Little Proto Trilogy for the 4-6 year olds in your life, or Beowulf: The Only One for adults who love a classic yarn.

All told with live character voices, music and sounds .

Downloads. Fast. Easy. Direct to your device.

 

“a consummate storyteller” — The New York Times

After the Holidays, A Time for Vikings!

On January 6th at 5 p.m. join Odds Bodkin at Grendel’s Den on Harvard Square for Odin and Thor Battle the Frost Giants, an adult storytelling.

Two wild Viking adventure myths scored on 12-string guitars, introduced with lore while Odds plays Celtic harp. A full evening of entertainment,humor and elemental imagination.

Tickets $15.



NEXT MINUTE DELIVERY of a TOUR DE FORCE

Adults love it, but kids really do, because it’s filled with too many driveway moments to mention. Odds Bodkin’s THE ODYSSEY: AN EPIC TELLING is four hours long. That’s plenty of imaginative audio for long family drives. And as a download, it delivers to your device in no time.

If you’ve never heard it, take Professor James Tatum of the Dartmouth Department of Classic’s recommendation: “This closest thing we have to a Homeric performance. A tour de force.”

You can hear samples here.

 

 

 

SALE ENDS TOMORROW! Odds Bodkin Story Drives

40% Off on Odds Bodkin’s story drives ends tomorrow, December 10th. Check them out. Instant downloads of individual titles always available, too!

Explore a world of myths, folktales, legends and original stories, told with live music, here.